RC Car Action Membership Site http://www.rccaraction.com/members RC Car Action Membership Site Wed, 09 Apr 2014 18:34:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 GMADE SAWBACK http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=gmade-sawback-3 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-3/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:55:00 +0000 RC Car Action http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-3/ 1/10 4WD TRAIL TRUCK | KIT

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

Jeep style and scaler detailing unite in this rugged trail machine

SAWBACK

Once familiar only to in-the-know crawling fans, Gmade's newest flat-fendered ride and a push from distributor HRP stand to give the brand far more publicity. Gmade broke into the industry with the R1 competition crawler, and now they've gone head-first after the scale market with the Sawback. Their experience on the rocks shows immediately, as the Sawback sports a very realistic-looking C-channel side rail chassis made of nickel-plated steel that provides a solid backbone, but it's the little things accenting the Sawback's unique suspension, overall setup, and rugged appearance that set it apart out on the trail — especially the old-school Jeep body. As I came closer to completing the Sawback's assembly, I felt like I was working on a full-sized custom Jeep in my garage in the early hours of the morning with only the anticipation of completing the build fueling me, and then I had to wait for the sun to rise to try it out!

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: GMA52000

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price: $269

  • Width: 5.58 in. (218mm)

  • Height: 9.68 in. (246mm)

  • Length: 17.4 in. (442mm)

  • Wheelbase: 11.29 in. (287mm)

  • Weight: 6.82 lb. (3093g)

  • Chassis: Nickel-plated steel C-channel

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Steel leaf spring

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Shock positions, chassis (F/R): 1/1

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 1/1

  • Shocks: Aluminum body, friction dampening with internal spring

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven 4WD with 3-counter gears/42.8:1 with 12-tooth pinion

  • Slipper clutch: None

  • Differential: Diff locker

  • Driveshafts: Steel front dogbones and rear straight driveshaft, plastic telescoping center shafts

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded

WHEELS AND TIRES

  • Wheels: Gmade VR01 3-piece 1.9 in. bead-lock

  • Tires: Gmade MT1901 1.9 in., super soft compound

  • Body: Gmade “no-top” Jeep-style body with interior

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Transmitter: Airtronics M12 2.4GHz (#90482, $480)

  • Receiver: Airtronics FHSS-4 4-channel receiver (#92014, $140)

  • Speed control: Tekin FX-R brushed FWD/REV speed control (#TT1091, $100)

  • Motor: Tekin T35 35-turn brushed motor (#TT2122, $65)

  • Steering servo: Savöx SC-0251MG “Larger Standard” Digital High-Torque Metal Gear Servo (#SAVSC0251MG, $41)

  • Battery: Racers Edge Prime 7.4V 75C 6000mAh Race Edition LiPo w/Deans plugs (#RCELP2S600075C, $110)

LEAF SPRING SUSPENSION

The Sawback's leaf spring suspension can be adjusted quickly and easily.

The TS-03 shocks did a good job of taming all the terrain thrown at the Sawback.

If scale realism is what you're aiming for, it doesn't get more scale than the Sawback's leaf spring suspension. Gmade includes a set of three leaf springs to fine-tune the Sawback's suspension to your specific driving needs. The leaf springs themselves connect to the axles with heavy-duty U-bolts. You can set the suspension to standard, soft, and hard. Since most of the driving I was intending on doing was rock crawling and mountain terrain, I initially set up the leaf springs to the softest setting. Damping duties are handled by the TS-03 aluminum shocks included with the Sawback, which feature interchangeable internal springs to back up the leaf springs in big-hit situations.

TRAIL-SPEC DRIVETRAIN

The twist-off gear cover gives you easy access to the pinion gear for quick ratio changes. Plastic universal shafts transfer the power from the center gearbox to the front, and rear axles and performed well, with no pop-offs to report.


The Sawback's full-time 4WD system is all business and was built with heavy horsepower in mind. The axle internals are housed in a robust graphite plastic housing that will withstand the hardest blows that are thrown at it. The ring and pinion gears are made of solid metal to ensure they put the power to the ground without stripping. Diff access is as easy as removing four screws to pop off the realistic-looking, polished metal differential cover. The center transmission houses three counter gears that add up to serious gear reduction. The Sawback includes a 12-tooth 32-pitch pinion gear that gives you a 42.8:1 overall ratio for a good mix of speed and climbing power. During testing, I installed a 9-tooth pinion that reduced the ratio even more to a stump-pulling 57:1. A pair of telescoping universal shafts connects the center tranny to the front and rear axles. The Sawback comes with a full set of ball bearings to ensure super smooth power delivery.

STEEL LADDER FRAME

The Sawback's nickel-plated chassis is so realistic that it will have you doing double takes. Although the chassis bolts together using nylon-captured nuts, it is still a good idea to use thread-lock.

When the Sawback has its body off, the first thing that catches your attention is its gorgeous frame, reminiscent of full-sized project cars. The ladder frame construction features steel C-channel side rails. The cross members that connect the rails, which include the receiver box, skidplate, and battery tray, bridge the rails and contribute to the chassis' torsional stiffness. The front of the chassis is protected by an attractive metal bumper, and the chassis itself is finished in an attractive nickel-plating that resists rust, improves durability, and looks fantastic.

THE SAWBACK INCLUDES METAL STEERING LINKAGES AS STANDARD THAT NOT ONLY ADD STEERING PRECISION, BUT ALSO MUCH-NEEDED WEIGHT TO THE FRONT OF THE TRUCK, WHICH HELPS WHEN CLIMBING STEEP HILLS AND ROCKS

Diff access is easy — just like a full-size truck.

Standard 12mm hexes accomo-date a huge variety of wheels.

The “engine cover” hides the speed control and receiver.

METAL LINKAGE STEERING

The Sawback's metal steering linkages won't buckle under pressure, which allows you to drive a precise line.

There are a lot of 4WD off-road and crawler vehicles on the market today that come with plastic linkage steering systems and only offer aluminum or steel linkages as aftermarket upgrades. The Sawback includes metal steering linkages as standard that not only add steering precision, but also much-needed weight to the front of the truck, which helps when climbing steep hills and rocks. Whereas plastic linkages bend or deflect under extreme loads, the Sawback's linkages hold true, allowing you to drive the line you want. The instructions have you assemble the steering with 0-degree of toe, but you can add toe-in or out at any time if you choose.

BEHIND THE WHEEL

The snow of Big Bear was no match for the Sawback.

Big Bear Lake, CA, was the first place that came to mind for testing the Sawback, and it proved an ideal stomping ground. Big Bear is nestled in SoCal's San Bernardino National Forest and has a near-infinite amount of natural rock, forest, and lake features, making it the perfect playground to test the limits of the Sawback. Snowboarding season had just started in Big Bear at the time of testing and the area had just received a snowstorm that dropped four inches of fresh powder, so the Sawback was ready to attack. Most drivers of full-sized cars that venture onto snow usually need tire chains to find traction in the white stuff, but these aren't necessary with the Sawback's aggressively lugged MT1901 tires. The tread pattern did an exceptional job digging into the snow, even when the trail went up and the white stuff was deep. As I moved out of the snow and onto some thick mud with molasses-like consistency, the Sawback made short work of the dense sludge, using its low gearing to power its way through. The chassis and all the components under the body were getting extremely dirty, but with everything nicely sealed, not a single piece of debris made its way to the electronics. I decided to clean off the Sawback the easy way and took it for a dip in Big Bear Lake. The lakeside had some slippery stones and moss-covered rocks, which did slow down the Sawback, but with some finesse, I was able to claw my way out of the wetness. Now that the Sawback was clean, I searched for a challenging rock garden, with obstacles escalating in difficulty, in order to test the different settings for the leaf springs. I started with the standard leaf spring setting, which handled small-sized rocks easily as the suspension conformed effectively around the obstacles. Moving on to medium to larger rocks, the Sawback started to show the limitations in suspension articulation and tended to lift a tire or two in the air, which wasn't the most stable way to rock climb, but the Sawback stayed upright and made its way through anything. I pulled the truck over and changed the leaf spring suspension to the softest setting. Back on the rocks, I directed the Sawback toward the medium- and large-sized rocks again and the suspension change was obvious. The suspension instantly gained approximately 20% more articulation, which now had me searching for harder lines to throw at the Sawback. Though the included kit tires were a soft compound, they were a little on the firm side compared to competition rock crawling tires and showed some tire slippage when the incline got super steep. The Sawback isn't a lightweight vehicle by any means, and that's helpful when you're rock crawling. It handled steep descents effortlessly as the weight kept all four tires hunkered down, while navigating a line with precision was easy thanks to the 57:1 ratio working in conjunction with the speed control's drag brake. While wrapping up the testing session, I threw on a set of rock crawler competition tires just for kicks. Though not as authentic looking as the Sawback's kit tires, the comp tires were made of soft-compound rubber that serious crawlers demand. With comp-grade rubber, the Sawback was an untamed animal that put a huge grin on my face as it fought through impressively tough terrain and stayed on all fours.

REALISTIC BODY

Designed to look like an early WW II-style Jeep, the Sawback's body is constructed of thick Lexan that withstood multiple rollovers during testing without suffering a crack. The stylish interior features nylon plastic seats, steering wheel, shifter, and rear-view mirror, accompanied by a decal sticker dashboard with dials and a glovebox. The windshield can even be folded down on those warm, sunny days — just don't get any bugs stuck in your teeth!

THE SCALE LOOKS ARE BACKED UP WITH TRUE-TO-SCALE PERFORMANCE AND THEN SOME; THE INSPIRATION AND FUN FACTOR THAT THE SAWBACK POSSESSES IS IMMENSE

+

  • Super-scale looks

  • Versatile internal gear ratio

  • Adjustable leaf spring suspension

  • Nickel-plated chassis fights scratches and corrosion

  • Chassis cross members come loose without thread-lock and extra build attention

  • Tires could be a softer compound

FINAL WORD

If scale crawlers are what you like, they don't get any more realistic than the Gmade Sawback. With the body off, the Sawback will have you doing double takes wondering if it's full-scale or RC. The scale looks are backed up with true-to-scale performance and then some; the inspiration and fun factor that the Sawback possesses is immense, so immense that it's beginning to inspire me to get a full-sized replica of this rig and go tame the unknown. I've always been a racer at heart, so if that's not the best compliment that I could give this truck, I don't know what is.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-3/feed/ 0
TEAM ASSOCIATED SC10RS http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=team-associated-sc10rs-3 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-3/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:55:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-3/ 1/10-SCALE ELECTRIC 2WD SHORT COURSE TRUCK | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

AE's newest RTR puts the Race in Race Spec

SC10RS

Team Associated launched the modern short course scene into the realm of competitive racing with the original SC10 kit, utilizing the then-undefeated ROAR National Champion RC10T4 platform as the basis for what quickly became the winningest truck in its class. By taking the T4 and stretching the chassis, then adorning the kit with scale-specific features like front and rear bumpers, an accurately modeled body, and even a set of mudflaps, the SC10 retained the T4's track prowess injected with a huge dose of scale realism. The platform served equally well in RTR form, fitted with proprietary electronics and topped with one of several officially licensed color schemes, but in typical Team Associated fashion, the engineers couldn't leave well enough alone. The new features and add-ons that had been developed for the kit version by their racing team (which is still undefeated in the modified 2WD short course class at the ROAR Nationals, now going on six years straight) trickled down to the RTR to create the newest version, the SC10RS, which stands for “Race Spec.” And they're not kidding.

VEHICLE SPECS



  • Item no.: 7054 (part no. varies by body choice)

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price:* $320

  • Width: 11.54 in. (293mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.2 in. (30mm)

  • Length: 21.65 in. (550mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.87 in. (327mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 4.59 lb. (2080g)

  • Chassis: Plastic composite tub

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Lower H-arm with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled aluminum coilover shocks

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: 3-gear transmission/2.6:1

  • Spur gear/pinion: 87/18

  • Slipper clutch: Externally adjustable dual-disc

  • Differential: Oil-filled bevel gear

  • Driveshafts: Steel dogbones

  • Bearings: Rubber-sealed

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Team Associated KMC replicas, black

  • Tires (F/R): Team Associated Stock SC10/JConcepts Subcultures, Green Compound

  • Body: Team Associated SC10

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Associated XP2G 2.4GHz 2-channel

  • Receiver: Associated TRS403SSi 2.4GHz 4-channel

  • Speed control: Associated XP SC700 brushless sensorless

  • Motor: Reedy 3300rpm/volt brushless sensorless

  • Steering servo: Associated XP S1903

TEST EQUIPMENT (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Battery: Reedy WolfPack 6500mAh 7.4V 2S LiPo (#734, $70)

* Varies by dealer

TRACK-DERIVED SUSPENSION

V2-edition shocks mate with tried-and-true T4-style suspension for a ride that can't be beat — literally!

The front and rear suspension for the SC10RS are lifted straight from the T4, with long arms and adjustable links poised to soak up any terrain. The RS retains all of the tuning options of the kit as well, and while it may not have the multitude of adjustments of some kits' Swiss-cheese-looking pieces, all of the available shock and camber link mounting options are strategically placed. Those suspension arms are damped by blue-anodized V2-style shocks that use preload clips for ride-height adjustment. Although these have since been replaced on the latest version of Factory Team kits by new big-bore-style dampers, the SC10RS's V2 units are head-and-shoulders above Team Associated's original shocks, with a much-improved O-ring seal construction that greatly improved durability.

RUGGED POWERTRAIN

The big news in the RS's transmission department is the V2-style slipper, which simply works better than what it replaced.

The compact 3-gear transmission is fitted with a gear differential, rather than the ball unit found in the Factory Team kit, but external adjustment is an easy sacrifice for bulletproof durability. The gear diff is sealed, offering the opportunity to be tuned with silicone oils of varying viscosity, but the RS's standard setup is versatile enough to work on almost any terrain. The V2 slipper clutch, another upgrade developed on the racetrack, offers a wider range of adjustment and is more consistent than the original unit that it replaced. The RS uses steel dogbones in place of CV-style axles, which are more expensive and require more maintenance, and should offer better handling over rough terrain to boot. Both front and rear axles on the SC10RS are fitted with 12mm drive hexes, which not only open up the available wheel choices to those offered for many different vehicles (even from other manufacturers), but allow the same wheels to be used in the front and rear.

STRETCHED CHASSIS

Team Associated calls the receiver box “water resistant,” but short of submerging the vehicle, it should keep the precious electronics safe from the elements.

The difference in wheelbase between the T4 and SC10 trucks is all accounted for in the molded tub chassis — as near as makes no difference, an inch and a half. The rest of the platform is similar, with front kick-up to recline the steering bellcranks to match the plane of the caster blocks, various structural ribbing to alter the truck's flex characteristics, and a swing-away battery hold-down strap that's secured by two twisting thumbscrews that need only be flicked 90 degrees in either direction to install or remove the battery. The underside of chassis is smooth and devoid of anything that may snag on the track surface, with raised edges for more cornering clearance, and lightweight nerf bars attach to the sides to provide support for the body should any rough-housing happen amongst competitors.

ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT


The XP2G fits well into hands of all sizes, operates seamlessly, and offers big adjustment dials that are easy to see and use at quick glance.

There's ample room for any electronic choices, and the water-resistant receiver box keeps the included XP receiver tucked into its own cozy cocoon.

The SC700 speed control is a smooth operator despite being sensorless.

Perhaps the most striking feature of the SC10RS over its predecessors is what's wrapped around the KMC replica wheels bolted to the rear axles: Team Associated's scale-specific short course tires were eschewed in favor of JConcepts Subcultures in gumball-soft Green Compound. Associated treads are still found up front, and the four are tucked within the fenders of the SC10's now-iconic body shell that closely mimics the trucks that duke it out in the Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series — with six officially licensed schemes to choose from. Team Associated fitted their own electronics, with a no-nonsense 2.4GHz radio system, metal gear servo, and XP SC700 brushless speed control accompanied by a Reedy 3300rpm/volt sensorless motor.

CHOOSE YOUR BODY



In addition to the faithful recreation of Carl Renezeder's Lucas Oil-sponsored truck, as well as the fan favorite Rockstar/Makita and Hart & Huntington schemes, the SC10RS is now available with Lucas Oil Slick Mist livery, CJ Greaves' awesome Monster Energy Toyota colors, and Eric Barron's incredible old-school Toyota factory TRD paintjob!

BEHIND THE WHEEL


I felt comfortable pushing the SC10RS almost immediately after walking up to the drivers' stand of SDRC Raceway, and the SC10RS's racing background is apparent from the first lap. The truck dives hard into the corner and rotates through the apex smoothly, without squirming around or getting out of shape. The T4 front suspension and steering setup gives the truck an incredible amount of steering throw in both directions, and it helps the SC10RS carve through tight corners like a samurai sword — perfect for the tight and twisty layout. I don't know if it's simply the shape of the body or the arrangement of the suspension, but the SC10 feels long and narrow behind the wheel — which isn't to say that it's tippy or unstable, but a comment on its composure while still being highly maneuverable when transitioning from one direction to the other. None of the jumps at the indoor track presented even the slightest hiccup, as the truck soaked up the track's bumps and jumps in stride.

The biggest changes from the original SC10 are best felt when bombing through a stretch of native terrain outdoors, when the peppy Reedy brushless motor has room to stretch its legs. This is where the JConcepts tires on the rear shine — at no time did the rear end of the truck step out of line unless commanded. With the balance of traction shifted more toward the rear than the original SC10 RTR, the RS begs to be driven with a heavy throttle finger and a huge smile. The truck tracked true every time I stabbed the throttle, unweighting the front tires and charging ahead with a slight rearward squat. The added rear grip from the soft-compound rubber meant that I could toss the truck harder into a turn, knowing that it would stick well enough to stop yawing when I wanted, and the lugs of the Subcultures dug well into softer dirt to help the truck power around big, rutted berms without incident. Braking stability is increased as well, with the truck only getting out of shape if the brakes were locked up on especially slippery hardpack, but it only served to make sliding the truck around more fun. Bigger jumps outdoors exposed more of a parachute effect from the big body that I found at the track, but it's nothing that a little bit of creative trimming wouldn't fix. Though the on-track performance of the SC10RS is an improvement over its predecessor, its biggest gains are only fully exploited when thrashing around a free-driving site.

+

  • Additional rear grip greatly improves the truck's overall performance

  • Wheel hexes are easier to use and take the guesswork out of maintaining stock of front and rear wheels

  • Brilliant new body choices

  • Aggressive handling may be challenging for newer drivers

FINAL WORD

It's difficult to mess with success, but the RS is an improvement over the original RTR in every way. Its various chassis upgrades, stolen straight from Team Associated's racing garage, add refreshing nuances to its driving demeanor, with added durability to boot, and the addition of some seriously race-ready rubber takes the truck to a whole new level in any situation. My favorite update, however, is the new bodies: I couldn't help but swoon over the new Toyota TRD racing paint scheme, a dutiful homage to the trucks that Ivan “Ironman” Stewart and Rod Millen raced in the original Mickey Thompson Stadium Off-Road Racing Series, the birthplace of short course racing. When it's time to update a winning platform, it can be tough to make improvements across the board — but the SC10RS nailed it.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-3/feed/ 0
KYOSHO MP9 READYSET http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kyosho-mp9-readyset-3 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-3/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:55:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-3/ 1/8-SCALE NITRO 4WD BUGGY | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

A world champion fresh out of the box

MP9 READYSET

Kyosho's new Inferno MP9 Readyset represents the upper echelon of today's competitive RTR 1/8-scale buggies, but in order to appreciate its place in RC history, you need to know first where it came from. As the class's popularity exploded at the local level, vast improvements in glow engine technology and suspension design in the early 2000s helped launch 1/8-scale nitro buggies to the forefront of RC racing. However, Kyosho was already enjoying a head start — after introducing the Inferno line of buggies in 1992, they went on an unprecedented tear of six straight IFMAR World Championships (and have won eight of the last eleven). RTR vehicles hit the scene at about the same time, and for the last decade, Kyosho's race-winning experience trickled down to the entry-level consumer with various almost-ready-to-run and full RTR versions of their most popular buggies. The MP9 Readyset is the trickest one yet, closely mimicking the TKI3 version of the MP9 that Kyosho's team drivers use in international competition, and yet Kyosho was able to turn a world-beating kit that sells for $900 into an RTR that sells for little more than half that.

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: KYO31888T1B

  • Scale: 1/8

  • Price*: $500

  • Width: 12.1 in. (307mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.1 in. (28mm)

  • Length: 19.3 in. (490mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.8 in. (325mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 7 lb. 6.9 oz. (3370g)

  • Chassis: Stamped aluminum plate

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Independent H-arm suspension with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber-link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled coilover shocks with threaded aluminum bodies

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven, four-wheel drive/3.31:1

  • Spur gear/clutch bell: 46/13

  • Clutch: 3-shoe centrifugal clutch with aluminum shoes

  • Differential: Front, center, and rear oil-filled bevel gear differentials

  • Driveshafts: Steel CV-style front driveshafts, steel center and rear dogbones

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded ball bearings

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Kyosho white dish wheels

  • Tires: Kyosho Micro Square Pin with open-cell foam inserts

  • Body: Kyosho pre-screened MP9 body

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Kyosho KT-201 3-channel 2.4GHz

  • Receiver: Kyosho KR-200 4-channel 2.4GHz

  • Engine: Kyosho KE-21R .21

  • Steering and throttle servos: Kyosho KS-401

  • Battery: Four AA batteries

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Fuel: Byron Originals 20% RACE 2000 Gen2, quart (#3130216, $10)

TRACK-READY SUSPENSION

Threaded preload collars on the gunmetal-anodized large-bore shocks are among the easy adjustments you can make to the MP9 to suit any running condition.

Armed with the same threaded large-bore shocks as the TKI3, minus a set of shock boots, the MP9 Ready-set's long-arm suspension is fit for both the racetrack and any terrain you'll find off the beaten path. The shock towers are stamped from 6061 aluminum, rather than machined from 7075-rated material, which helps to lower the cost of the overall buggy. Some of the near-infinite tuning options of the factory kit, like the Swiss cheese shock and camber link mounting options, were reduced in order to simplify suspension setup for the introductory racer. There's still plenty to be adjusted, however, with threaded camber and toe links, caster, and more. The suspension pivot blocks use replaceable bushings, like the TKI3, so you can alter the car's toe-in and anti-squat, and change them out when they wear. The front and rear hubs are plastic, and the steering knuckles are cast aluminum, but all three can be updated to the machined-aluminum pieces from the TKI3.

RACE-WINNING PLATFORM

Protective boxes for the receiver and battery pack keep both vital items safe and secure. The forward-flipping fuel tank lid is accessible with the body on for quick pit stops!

If the shocks don't convince you of this buggy's pedigree, look no further than the stamped aluminum radio tray on the MP9 Readyset for proof that Kyosho's racing influence directly benefits its product line, as it's the same unit used on the TKI3. Rather than being tucked behind the receiver box like on the original MP9, the clip-secured box for the receiver battery (or AA holder, which comes with the RTR) is mounted in the right-side mud guard next to the steering servo for better weight distribution. Just a couple of years ago, Kyosho frontman Jared Tebo hand-fabricated this mod on his racecars before it was introduced in the TKI2 kit, and rather than using up old parts, Kyosho went with this new design for the Readyset. Again, using stamped 6061 aluminum in place of machined 7075 for the chassis contributed to most of the Readyset's cost savings, as the replacement Readyset chassis is less than half the price of the full-option TKI3 plate ($50 versus $120). That's a perfect example of living in affluence while spending responsibly, or what the younger crowd would call “ballin' on a budget.” Plastic chassis braces add an appropriate amount of rigidity to allow the suspension to do its job.


Kyosho's KT201 radio is light and comfortable, and the but tons on top make it simple to navigate through the adjustments displayed on the screen — it's not very big, but it's better than using analog adjustment dials!

TOP-SHELF TOPPINGS

Not only does the polished exhaust pipe look nice, but the shape of its cone is also tuned to provide a balance of power and fuel economy. Tuned pipes are often an option for most RTRs!

The MP9 Readyset sports the previous-generation TKI2 body, which looks more conservative than the radical cab-forward TKI3 lid, and beneath it is similarly high-quality equipment. Kyosho's own radio equipment is used throughout, with a digital version of the comfortable and lightweight Syncro KT-201 2.4GHz transmitter mating to the tiny KR-200 4-channel receiver, and KS-401 servos handle both steering and throttle/brake duties. Lightweight white dish wheels wrapped in aggressive “micro square pin-type” tires are bolted to the buggy's industry standard 17mm hubs, which are motivated by Kyosho's KE21R pull-start engine that breathes out of a polished and tuned exhaust pipe.

KYOSHO'S ENGINEERS SPENT CONSIDERABLE EFFORT ON CREATING DIFFERENTIALS FOR THE MP9 THAT WERE SMALLER AND LIGHTER THAN TRADITIONAL DIFFS, WHICH PUTS LESS STRAIN ON THE ENGINE AND CLUTCH WHILE OFFERING FASTER ACCELERATION

TRACK-OPTIMIZED DRIVETRAIN

The MP9 platform's drivetrain is arranged to keep the driveshafts straight, which makes them as efficient as possible. Dogbones replace the center universals of the TKI3.

Because the strain of racing with high-powered engines is rougher than anything an RTR will likely see, MP9 Ready-set's powertrain is pulled straight from the TKI3 racecar with the simple change of using dogbones for the center and rear driveshafts (but maintaining the front universals). Kyosho's engineers spent considerable effort on creating differentials for the MP9 that were smaller and lighter than traditional diffs, which puts less strain on the engine and clutch while offering faster acceleration, and the Readyset's engine is quite thankful for that foresight! The differentials themselves are filled with oil, rather than grease like many RTRs, and the MP9's standard 3-shoe aluminum clutch is installed in place of a cheaper and simpler plastic 2-shoe setup.

TEST GEAR: BYRON RACE GEN2 FUEL


Since RC cars powered by glow engines use special fuel, rather than simple unleaded gasoline, choosing the right juice is important. Every RC fuel uses three ingredients — nitromethane, methyl alcohol (also called methanol), and oil (in varying amounts of synthetic and castor varieties) — though each fuel manufacturer has their own mixing protocols and sources. Byron Fuels offers several different fuels to suit anyone from the backyard hero to the Worlds-level racer. Since Kyosho recommends using 20% nitro in the KE21R engine, I chose RACE 2000 Gen2 for its middle-of-the-road 12% oil package, which offers a balance of power, tuning consistency, and engine protection.

BEHIND THE WHEEL


Let's get this out of the way — Kyosho's KE21R was the most impressive pull-start RTR engine I've ever used. It never took more than five pulls to fire it up for break-in, throughout the photo shoot, and during all of my testing. The carburetor was responsive to changes without constantly needing to be tweaked, and it proved to be a great match for the car's capabilities with plenty of power. After patiently breaking in the engine and tuning it to breathe fire, it lit up the tires from a standstill and left four trails of dirt in its wake; the combination of the engine's power and the aluminum clutch shoes gives the Readyset impressive acceleration that makes it easy to hop through consecutive jumps or squirt out of a rut toward the next obstacle. The engine is the heart of any racecar, and it's the defining factor of any nitro-powered RTR. Score one for the MP9 Readyset!

While 1/8-scale buggies were bred for the racetrack, they're tremendously fun to drive anywhere, but I've never been able to bring myself to go searching for the biggest trail jumps and berms with a $900+ MP9 kit. The Readyset, however, was eager to oblige my increasing curiosity and bravery. By the end of the day, I was sending the buggy over the tallest berm at our favorite Escondido park track, flying 3 to 4 feet overhead and covering at least 30 feet before smacking back to the ground — it sounds impressive, but it's not an atypical obstacle on large nitro racetracks in the U.S. The buggy sailed straight and true each time, was manageable in flight, and though it bottomed out when landing, it never got out of shape. When it was time to get on the binders, stabbing the trigger forward brought the Readyset to a controlled halt in a straight line, an indication that the front-to-rear brake bias is right on the money. The brakes were easy to modulate when entering a corner so that the fronts didn't lock up and cause the buggy to push, and once broken in, they showed very little sign of fading after plenty of hardcore testing.

Once I got the MP9 Readyset to Chula Vista RC Raceway, it was even easier to see the car's close resemblance to the full-blown racing model. Even with the stock tires I was able to immediately start clocking respectable laps, pushing the car harder as I grew more comfortable. The MP9 platform has a great mix of steering and traction, which makes carrying cornering speed easy, and the car stayed composed over the track's rougher sections. In fact, the limits of the Readyset's capabilities proved to be the included servos — rated at just 90 oz.-in. of torque with a .16-second transit time, they're perfectly fine for cruising around but not quite fast or strong enough to truly drive the car hard. They do tame the car's reactivity down, however, which will make it easier for new drivers to learn to control it before upgrading.

+

  • Reliable and powerful engine

  • Well-sorted chassis is equally at home on the track and trail

  • Highly upgradeable

  • AA holder used for receiver power

  • Not-quite-powerful-enough servos dampen car's otherwise stellar performance

FINAL WORD

With so much of the RC world going toward electric power, it takes something special for a nitro RTR to stick out above the crowd — but that's exactly what Kyosho came up with when they created the MP9 Readyset. A quick perusal of the MP9 Readyset's parts list for those items indicated “MP9RS,” designating that they're exclusive to the RTR version, shows just how close this car is to full factory racing spec. While it would be cost-prohibitive to upgrade the whole car piece by piece, that potential is indicative of how much room for growth this buggy has — it is, after all, based on a World Champion.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-3/feed/ 0
GMADE SAWBACK http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=gmade-sawback-2 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-2/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:50:00 +0000 RC Car Action http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-2/ 1/10 4WD TRAIL TRUCK | KIT

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

Jeep style and scaler detailing unite in this rugged trail machine

SAWBACK

Once familiar only to in-the-know crawling fans, Gmade's newest flat-fendered ride and a push from distributor HRP stand to give the brand far more publicity. Gmade broke into the industry with the R1 competition crawler, and now they've gone head-first after the scale market with the Sawback. Their experience on the rocks shows immediately, as the Sawback sports a very realistic-looking C-channel side rail chassis made of nickel-plated steel that provides a solid backbone, but it's the little things accenting the Sawback's unique suspension, overall setup, and rugged appearance that set it apart out on the trail — especially the old-school Jeep body. As I came closer to completing the Sawback's assembly, I felt like I was working on a full-sized custom Jeep in my garage in the early hours of the morning with only the anticipation of completing the build fueling me, and then I had to wait for the sun to rise to try it out!

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: GMA52000

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price: $269

  • Width: 5.58 in. (218mm)

  • Height: 9.68 in. (246mm)

  • Length: 17.4 in. (442mm)

  • Wheelbase: 11.29 in. (287mm)

  • Weight: 6.82 lb. (3093g)

  • Chassis: Nickel-plated steel C-channel

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Steel leaf spring

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Shock positions, chassis (F/R): 1/1

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 1/1

  • Shocks: Aluminum body, friction dampening with internal spring

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven 4WD with 3-counter gears/42.8:1 with 12-tooth pinion

  • Slipper clutch: None

  • Differential: Diff locker

  • Driveshafts: Steel front dogbones and rear straight driveshaft, plastic telescoping center shafts

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded

WHEELS AND TIRES

  • Wheels: Gmade VR01 3-piece 1.9 in. bead-lock

  • Tires: Gmade MT1901 1.9 in., super soft compound

  • Body: Gmade “no-top” Jeep-style body with interior

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Transmitter: Airtronics M12 2.4GHz (#90482, $480)

  • Receiver: Airtronics FHSS-4 4-channel receiver (#92014, $140)

  • Speed control: Tekin FX-R brushed FWD/REV speed control (#TT1091, $100)

  • Motor: Tekin T35 35-turn brushed motor (#TT2122, $65)

  • Steering servo: Savöx SC-0251MG “Larger Standard” Digital High-Torque Metal Gear Servo (#SAVSC0251MG, $41)

  • Battery: Racers Edge Prime 7.4V 75C 6000mAh Race Edition LiPo w/Deans plugs (#RCELP2S600075C, $110)

LEAF SPRING SUSPENSION

The Sawback's leaf spring suspension can be adjusted quickly and easily.

The TS-03 shocks did a good job of taming all the terrain thrown at the Sawback.

If scale realism is what you're aiming for, it doesn't get more scale than the Sawback's leaf spring suspension. Gmade includes a set of three leaf springs to fine-tune the Sawback's suspension to your specific driving needs. The leaf springs themselves connect to the axles with heavy-duty U-bolts. You can set the suspension to standard, soft, and hard. Since most of the driving I was intending on doing was rock crawling and mountain terrain, I initially set up the leaf springs to the softest setting. Damping duties are handled by the TS-03 aluminum shocks included with the Sawback, which feature interchangeable internal springs to back up the leaf springs in big-hit situations.

TRAIL-SPEC DRIVETRAIN

The twist-off gear cover gives you easy access to the pinion gear for quick ratio changes. Plastic universal shafts transfer the power from the center gearbox to the front, and rear axles and performed well, with no pop-offs to report.


The Sawback's full-time 4WD system is all business and was built with heavy horsepower in mind. The axle internals are housed in a robust graphite plastic housing that will withstand the hardest blows that are thrown at it. The ring and pinion gears are made of solid metal to ensure they put the power to the ground without stripping. Diff access is as easy as removing four screws to pop off the realistic-looking, polished metal differential cover. The center transmission houses three counter gears that add up to serious gear reduction. The Sawback includes a 12-tooth 32-pitch pinion gear that gives you a 42.8:1 overall ratio for a good mix of speed and climbing power. During testing, I installed a 9-tooth pinion that reduced the ratio even more to a stump-pulling 57:1. A pair of telescoping universal shafts connects the center tranny to the front and rear axles. The Sawback comes with a full set of ball bearings to ensure super smooth power delivery.

STEEL LADDER FRAME

The Sawback's nickel-plated chassis is so realistic that it will have you doing double takes. Although the chassis bolts together using nylon-captured nuts, it is still a good idea to use thread-lock.

When the Sawback has its body off, the first thing that catches your attention is its gorgeous frame, reminiscent of full-sized project cars. The ladder frame construction features steel C-channel side rails. The cross members that connect the rails, which include the receiver box, skidplate, and battery tray, bridge the rails and contribute to the chassis' torsional stiffness. The front of the chassis is protected by an attractive metal bumper, and the chassis itself is finished in an attractive nickel-plating that resists rust, improves durability, and looks fantastic.

THE SAWBACK INCLUDES METAL STEERING LINKAGES AS STANDARD THAT NOT ONLY ADD STEERING PRECISION, BUT ALSO MUCH-NEEDED WEIGHT TO THE FRONT OF THE TRUCK, WHICH HELPS WHEN CLIMBING STEEP HILLS AND ROCKS

Diff access is easy — just like a full-size truck.

Standard 12mm hexes accomo-date a huge variety of wheels.

The “engine cover” hides the speed control and receiver.

METAL LINKAGE STEERING

The Sawback's metal steering linkages won't buckle under pressure, which allows you to drive a precise line.

There are a lot of 4WD off-road and crawler vehicles on the market today that come with plastic linkage steering systems and only offer aluminum or steel linkages as aftermarket upgrades. The Sawback includes metal steering linkages as standard that not only add steering precision, but also much-needed weight to the front of the truck, which helps when climbing steep hills and rocks. Whereas plastic linkages bend or deflect under extreme loads, the Sawback's linkages hold true, allowing you to drive the line you want. The instructions have you assemble the steering with 0-degree of toe, but you can add toe-in or out at any time if you choose.

BEHIND THE WHEEL

The snow of Big Bear was no match for the Sawback.

Big Bear Lake, CA, was the first place that came to mind for testing the Sawback, and it proved an ideal stomping ground. Big Bear is nestled in SoCal's San Bernardino National Forest and has a near-infinite amount of natural rock, forest, and lake features, making it the perfect playground to test the limits of the Sawback. Snowboarding season had just started in Big Bear at the time of testing and the area had just received a snowstorm that dropped four inches of fresh powder, so the Sawback was ready to attack. Most drivers of full-sized cars that venture onto snow usually need tire chains to find traction in the white stuff, but these aren't necessary with the Sawback's aggressively lugged MT1901 tires. The tread pattern did an exceptional job digging into the snow, even when the trail went up and the white stuff was deep. As I moved out of the snow and onto some thick mud with molasses-like consistency, the Sawback made short work of the dense sludge, using its low gearing to power its way through. The chassis and all the components under the body were getting extremely dirty, but with everything nicely sealed, not a single piece of debris made its way to the electronics. I decided to clean off the Sawback the easy way and took it for a dip in Big Bear Lake. The lakeside had some slippery stones and moss-covered rocks, which did slow down the Sawback, but with some finesse, I was able to claw my way out of the wetness. Now that the Sawback was clean, I searched for a challenging rock garden, with obstacles escalating in difficulty, in order to test the different settings for the leaf springs. I started with the standard leaf spring setting, which handled small-sized rocks easily as the suspension conformed effectively around the obstacles. Moving on to medium to larger rocks, the Sawback started to show the limitations in suspension articulation and tended to lift a tire or two in the air, which wasn't the most stable way to rock climb, but the Sawback stayed upright and made its way through anything. I pulled the truck over and changed the leaf spring suspension to the softest setting. Back on the rocks, I directed the Sawback toward the medium- and large-sized rocks again and the suspension change was obvious. The suspension instantly gained approximately 20% more articulation, which now had me searching for harder lines to throw at the Sawback. Though the included kit tires were a soft compound, they were a little on the firm side compared to competition rock crawling tires and showed some tire slippage when the incline got super steep. The Sawback isn't a lightweight vehicle by any means, and that's helpful when you're rock crawling. It handled steep descents effortlessly as the weight kept all four tires hunkered down, while navigating a line with precision was easy thanks to the 57:1 ratio working in conjunction with the speed control's drag brake. While wrapping up the testing session, I threw on a set of rock crawler competition tires just for kicks. Though not as authentic looking as the Sawback's kit tires, the comp tires were made of soft-compound rubber that serious crawlers demand. With comp-grade rubber, the Sawback was an untamed animal that put a huge grin on my face as it fought through impressively tough terrain and stayed on all fours.

REALISTIC BODY

Designed to look like an early WW II-style Jeep, the Sawback's body is constructed of thick Lexan that withstood multiple rollovers during testing without suffering a crack. The stylish interior features nylon plastic seats, steering wheel, shifter, and rear-view mirror, accompanied by a decal sticker dashboard with dials and a glovebox. The windshield can even be folded down on those warm, sunny days — just don't get any bugs stuck in your teeth!

THE SCALE LOOKS ARE BACKED UP WITH TRUE-TO-SCALE PERFORMANCE AND THEN SOME; THE INSPIRATION AND FUN FACTOR THAT THE SAWBACK POSSESSES IS IMMENSE

+

  • Super-scale looks

  • Versatile internal gear ratio

  • Adjustable leaf spring suspension

  • Nickel-plated chassis fights scratches and corrosion

  • Chassis cross members come loose without thread-lock and extra build attention

  • Tires could be a softer compound

FINAL WORD

If scale crawlers are what you like, they don't get any more realistic than the Gmade Sawback. With the body off, the Sawback will have you doing double takes wondering if it's full-scale or RC. The scale looks are backed up with true-to-scale performance and then some; the inspiration and fun factor that the Sawback possesses is immense, so immense that it's beginning to inspire me to get a full-sized replica of this rig and go tame the unknown. I've always been a racer at heart, so if that's not the best compliment that I could give this truck, I don't know what is.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback-2/feed/ 0
TEAM ASSOCIATED SC10RS http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=team-associated-sc10rs-2 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-2/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:50:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-2/ 1/10-SCALE ELECTRIC 2WD SHORT COURSE TRUCK | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

AE's newest RTR puts the Race in Race Spec

SC10RS

Team Associated launched the modern short course scene into the realm of competitive racing with the original SC10 kit, utilizing the then-undefeated ROAR National Champion RC10T4 platform as the basis for what quickly became the winningest truck in its class. By taking the T4 and stretching the chassis, then adorning the kit with scale-specific features like front and rear bumpers, an accurately modeled body, and even a set of mudflaps, the SC10 retained the T4's track prowess injected with a huge dose of scale realism. The platform served equally well in RTR form, fitted with proprietary electronics and topped with one of several officially licensed color schemes, but in typical Team Associated fashion, the engineers couldn't leave well enough alone. The new features and add-ons that had been developed for the kit version by their racing team (which is still undefeated in the modified 2WD short course class at the ROAR Nationals, now going on six years straight) trickled down to the RTR to create the newest version, the SC10RS, which stands for “Race Spec.” And they're not kidding.

VEHICLE SPECS



  • Item no.: 7054 (part no. varies by body choice)

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price:* $320

  • Width: 11.54 in. (293mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.2 in. (30mm)

  • Length: 21.65 in. (550mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.87 in. (327mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 4.59 lb. (2080g)

  • Chassis: Plastic composite tub

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Lower H-arm with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled aluminum coilover shocks

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: 3-gear transmission/2.6:1

  • Spur gear/pinion: 87/18

  • Slipper clutch: Externally adjustable dual-disc

  • Differential: Oil-filled bevel gear

  • Driveshafts: Steel dogbones

  • Bearings: Rubber-sealed

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Team Associated KMC replicas, black

  • Tires (F/R): Team Associated Stock SC10/JConcepts Subcultures, Green Compound

  • Body: Team Associated SC10

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Associated XP2G 2.4GHz 2-channel

  • Receiver: Associated TRS403SSi 2.4GHz 4-channel

  • Speed control: Associated XP SC700 brushless sensorless

  • Motor: Reedy 3300rpm/volt brushless sensorless

  • Steering servo: Associated XP S1903

TEST EQUIPMENT (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Battery: Reedy WolfPack 6500mAh 7.4V 2S LiPo (#734, $70)

* Varies by dealer

TRACK-DERIVED SUSPENSION

V2-edition shocks mate with tried-and-true T4-style suspension for a ride that can't be beat — literally!

The front and rear suspension for the SC10RS are lifted straight from the T4, with long arms and adjustable links poised to soak up any terrain. The RS retains all of the tuning options of the kit as well, and while it may not have the multitude of adjustments of some kits' Swiss-cheese-looking pieces, all of the available shock and camber link mounting options are strategically placed. Those suspension arms are damped by blue-anodized V2-style shocks that use preload clips for ride-height adjustment. Although these have since been replaced on the latest version of Factory Team kits by new big-bore-style dampers, the SC10RS's V2 units are head-and-shoulders above Team Associated's original shocks, with a much-improved O-ring seal construction that greatly improved durability.

RUGGED POWERTRAIN

The big news in the RS's transmission department is the V2-style slipper, which simply works better than what it replaced.

The compact 3-gear transmission is fitted with a gear differential, rather than the ball unit found in the Factory Team kit, but external adjustment is an easy sacrifice for bulletproof durability. The gear diff is sealed, offering the opportunity to be tuned with silicone oils of varying viscosity, but the RS's standard setup is versatile enough to work on almost any terrain. The V2 slipper clutch, another upgrade developed on the racetrack, offers a wider range of adjustment and is more consistent than the original unit that it replaced. The RS uses steel dogbones in place of CV-style axles, which are more expensive and require more maintenance, and should offer better handling over rough terrain to boot. Both front and rear axles on the SC10RS are fitted with 12mm drive hexes, which not only open up the available wheel choices to those offered for many different vehicles (even from other manufacturers), but allow the same wheels to be used in the front and rear.

STRETCHED CHASSIS

Team Associated calls the receiver box “water resistant,” but short of submerging the vehicle, it should keep the precious electronics safe from the elements.

The difference in wheelbase between the T4 and SC10 trucks is all accounted for in the molded tub chassis — as near as makes no difference, an inch and a half. The rest of the platform is similar, with front kick-up to recline the steering bellcranks to match the plane of the caster blocks, various structural ribbing to alter the truck's flex characteristics, and a swing-away battery hold-down strap that's secured by two twisting thumbscrews that need only be flicked 90 degrees in either direction to install or remove the battery. The underside of chassis is smooth and devoid of anything that may snag on the track surface, with raised edges for more cornering clearance, and lightweight nerf bars attach to the sides to provide support for the body should any rough-housing happen amongst competitors.

ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT


The XP2G fits well into hands of all sizes, operates seamlessly, and offers big adjustment dials that are easy to see and use at quick glance.

There's ample room for any electronic choices, and the water-resistant receiver box keeps the included XP receiver tucked into its own cozy cocoon.

The SC700 speed control is a smooth operator despite being sensorless.

Perhaps the most striking feature of the SC10RS over its predecessors is what's wrapped around the KMC replica wheels bolted to the rear axles: Team Associated's scale-specific short course tires were eschewed in favor of JConcepts Subcultures in gumball-soft Green Compound. Associated treads are still found up front, and the four are tucked within the fenders of the SC10's now-iconic body shell that closely mimics the trucks that duke it out in the Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series — with six officially licensed schemes to choose from. Team Associated fitted their own electronics, with a no-nonsense 2.4GHz radio system, metal gear servo, and XP SC700 brushless speed control accompanied by a Reedy 3300rpm/volt sensorless motor.

CHOOSE YOUR BODY



In addition to the faithful recreation of Carl Renezeder's Lucas Oil-sponsored truck, as well as the fan favorite Rockstar/Makita and Hart & Huntington schemes, the SC10RS is now available with Lucas Oil Slick Mist livery, CJ Greaves' awesome Monster Energy Toyota colors, and Eric Barron's incredible old-school Toyota factory TRD paintjob!

BEHIND THE WHEEL


I felt comfortable pushing the SC10RS almost immediately after walking up to the drivers' stand of SDRC Raceway, and the SC10RS's racing background is apparent from the first lap. The truck dives hard into the corner and rotates through the apex smoothly, without squirming around or getting out of shape. The T4 front suspension and steering setup gives the truck an incredible amount of steering throw in both directions, and it helps the SC10RS carve through tight corners like a samurai sword — perfect for the tight and twisty layout. I don't know if it's simply the shape of the body or the arrangement of the suspension, but the SC10 feels long and narrow behind the wheel — which isn't to say that it's tippy or unstable, but a comment on its composure while still being highly maneuverable when transitioning from one direction to the other. None of the jumps at the indoor track presented even the slightest hiccup, as the truck soaked up the track's bumps and jumps in stride.

The biggest changes from the original SC10 are best felt when bombing through a stretch of native terrain outdoors, when the peppy Reedy brushless motor has room to stretch its legs. This is where the JConcepts tires on the rear shine — at no time did the rear end of the truck step out of line unless commanded. With the balance of traction shifted more toward the rear than the original SC10 RTR, the RS begs to be driven with a heavy throttle finger and a huge smile. The truck tracked true every time I stabbed the throttle, unweighting the front tires and charging ahead with a slight rearward squat. The added rear grip from the soft-compound rubber meant that I could toss the truck harder into a turn, knowing that it would stick well enough to stop yawing when I wanted, and the lugs of the Subcultures dug well into softer dirt to help the truck power around big, rutted berms without incident. Braking stability is increased as well, with the truck only getting out of shape if the brakes were locked up on especially slippery hardpack, but it only served to make sliding the truck around more fun. Bigger jumps outdoors exposed more of a parachute effect from the big body that I found at the track, but it's nothing that a little bit of creative trimming wouldn't fix. Though the on-track performance of the SC10RS is an improvement over its predecessor, its biggest gains are only fully exploited when thrashing around a free-driving site.

+

  • Additional rear grip greatly improves the truck's overall performance

  • Wheel hexes are easier to use and take the guesswork out of maintaining stock of front and rear wheels

  • Brilliant new body choices

  • Aggressive handling may be challenging for newer drivers

FINAL WORD

It's difficult to mess with success, but the RS is an improvement over the original RTR in every way. Its various chassis upgrades, stolen straight from Team Associated's racing garage, add refreshing nuances to its driving demeanor, with added durability to boot, and the addition of some seriously race-ready rubber takes the truck to a whole new level in any situation. My favorite update, however, is the new bodies: I couldn't help but swoon over the new Toyota TRD racing paint scheme, a dutiful homage to the trucks that Ivan “Ironman” Stewart and Rod Millen raced in the original Mickey Thompson Stadium Off-Road Racing Series, the birthplace of short course racing. When it's time to update a winning platform, it can be tough to make improvements across the board — but the SC10RS nailed it.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs-2/feed/ 0
KYOSHO MP9 READYSET http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kyosho-mp9-readyset-2 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-2/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:50:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-2/ 1/8-SCALE NITRO 4WD BUGGY | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

A world champion fresh out of the box

MP9 READYSET

Kyosho's new Inferno MP9 Readyset represents the upper echelon of today's competitive RTR 1/8-scale buggies, but in order to appreciate its place in RC history, you need to know first where it came from. As the class's popularity exploded at the local level, vast improvements in glow engine technology and suspension design in the early 2000s helped launch 1/8-scale nitro buggies to the forefront of RC racing. However, Kyosho was already enjoying a head start — after introducing the Inferno line of buggies in 1992, they went on an unprecedented tear of six straight IFMAR World Championships (and have won eight of the last eleven). RTR vehicles hit the scene at about the same time, and for the last decade, Kyosho's race-winning experience trickled down to the entry-level consumer with various almost-ready-to-run and full RTR versions of their most popular buggies. The MP9 Readyset is the trickest one yet, closely mimicking the TKI3 version of the MP9 that Kyosho's team drivers use in international competition, and yet Kyosho was able to turn a world-beating kit that sells for $900 into an RTR that sells for little more than half that.

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: KYO31888T1B

  • Scale: 1/8

  • Price*: $500

  • Width: 12.1 in. (307mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.1 in. (28mm)

  • Length: 19.3 in. (490mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.8 in. (325mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 7 lb. 6.9 oz. (3370g)

  • Chassis: Stamped aluminum plate

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Independent H-arm suspension with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber-link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled coilover shocks with threaded aluminum bodies

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven, four-wheel drive/3.31:1

  • Spur gear/clutch bell: 46/13

  • Clutch: 3-shoe centrifugal clutch with aluminum shoes

  • Differential: Front, center, and rear oil-filled bevel gear differentials

  • Driveshafts: Steel CV-style front driveshafts, steel center and rear dogbones

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded ball bearings

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Kyosho white dish wheels

  • Tires: Kyosho Micro Square Pin with open-cell foam inserts

  • Body: Kyosho pre-screened MP9 body

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Kyosho KT-201 3-channel 2.4GHz

  • Receiver: Kyosho KR-200 4-channel 2.4GHz

  • Engine: Kyosho KE-21R .21

  • Steering and throttle servos: Kyosho KS-401

  • Battery: Four AA batteries

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Fuel: Byron Originals 20% RACE 2000 Gen2, quart (#3130216, $10)

TRACK-READY SUSPENSION

Threaded preload collars on the gunmetal-anodized large-bore shocks are among the easy adjustments you can make to the MP9 to suit any running condition.

Armed with the same threaded large-bore shocks as the TKI3, minus a set of shock boots, the MP9 Ready-set's long-arm suspension is fit for both the racetrack and any terrain you'll find off the beaten path. The shock towers are stamped from 6061 aluminum, rather than machined from 7075-rated material, which helps to lower the cost of the overall buggy. Some of the near-infinite tuning options of the factory kit, like the Swiss cheese shock and camber link mounting options, were reduced in order to simplify suspension setup for the introductory racer. There's still plenty to be adjusted, however, with threaded camber and toe links, caster, and more. The suspension pivot blocks use replaceable bushings, like the TKI3, so you can alter the car's toe-in and anti-squat, and change them out when they wear. The front and rear hubs are plastic, and the steering knuckles are cast aluminum, but all three can be updated to the machined-aluminum pieces from the TKI3.

RACE-WINNING PLATFORM

Protective boxes for the receiver and battery pack keep both vital items safe and secure. The forward-flipping fuel tank lid is accessible with the body on for quick pit stops!

If the shocks don't convince you of this buggy's pedigree, look no further than the stamped aluminum radio tray on the MP9 Readyset for proof that Kyosho's racing influence directly benefits its product line, as it's the same unit used on the TKI3. Rather than being tucked behind the receiver box like on the original MP9, the clip-secured box for the receiver battery (or AA holder, which comes with the RTR) is mounted in the right-side mud guard next to the steering servo for better weight distribution. Just a couple of years ago, Kyosho frontman Jared Tebo hand-fabricated this mod on his racecars before it was introduced in the TKI2 kit, and rather than using up old parts, Kyosho went with this new design for the Readyset. Again, using stamped 6061 aluminum in place of machined 7075 for the chassis contributed to most of the Readyset's cost savings, as the replacement Readyset chassis is less than half the price of the full-option TKI3 plate ($50 versus $120). That's a perfect example of living in affluence while spending responsibly, or what the younger crowd would call “ballin' on a budget.” Plastic chassis braces add an appropriate amount of rigidity to allow the suspension to do its job.


Kyosho's KT201 radio is light and comfortable, and the but tons on top make it simple to navigate through the adjustments displayed on the screen — it's not very big, but it's better than using analog adjustment dials!

TOP-SHELF TOPPINGS

Not only does the polished exhaust pipe look nice, but the shape of its cone is also tuned to provide a balance of power and fuel economy. Tuned pipes are often an option for most RTRs!

The MP9 Readyset sports the previous-generation TKI2 body, which looks more conservative than the radical cab-forward TKI3 lid, and beneath it is similarly high-quality equipment. Kyosho's own radio equipment is used throughout, with a digital version of the comfortable and lightweight Syncro KT-201 2.4GHz transmitter mating to the tiny KR-200 4-channel receiver, and KS-401 servos handle both steering and throttle/brake duties. Lightweight white dish wheels wrapped in aggressive “micro square pin-type” tires are bolted to the buggy's industry standard 17mm hubs, which are motivated by Kyosho's KE21R pull-start engine that breathes out of a polished and tuned exhaust pipe.

KYOSHO'S ENGINEERS SPENT CONSIDERABLE EFFORT ON CREATING DIFFERENTIALS FOR THE MP9 THAT WERE SMALLER AND LIGHTER THAN TRADITIONAL DIFFS, WHICH PUTS LESS STRAIN ON THE ENGINE AND CLUTCH WHILE OFFERING FASTER ACCELERATION

TRACK-OPTIMIZED DRIVETRAIN

The MP9 platform's drivetrain is arranged to keep the driveshafts straight, which makes them as efficient as possible. Dogbones replace the center universals of the TKI3.

Because the strain of racing with high-powered engines is rougher than anything an RTR will likely see, MP9 Ready-set's powertrain is pulled straight from the TKI3 racecar with the simple change of using dogbones for the center and rear driveshafts (but maintaining the front universals). Kyosho's engineers spent considerable effort on creating differentials for the MP9 that were smaller and lighter than traditional diffs, which puts less strain on the engine and clutch while offering faster acceleration, and the Readyset's engine is quite thankful for that foresight! The differentials themselves are filled with oil, rather than grease like many RTRs, and the MP9's standard 3-shoe aluminum clutch is installed in place of a cheaper and simpler plastic 2-shoe setup.

TEST GEAR: BYRON RACE GEN2 FUEL


Since RC cars powered by glow engines use special fuel, rather than simple unleaded gasoline, choosing the right juice is important. Every RC fuel uses three ingredients — nitromethane, methyl alcohol (also called methanol), and oil (in varying amounts of synthetic and castor varieties) — though each fuel manufacturer has their own mixing protocols and sources. Byron Fuels offers several different fuels to suit anyone from the backyard hero to the Worlds-level racer. Since Kyosho recommends using 20% nitro in the KE21R engine, I chose RACE 2000 Gen2 for its middle-of-the-road 12% oil package, which offers a balance of power, tuning consistency, and engine protection.

BEHIND THE WHEEL


Let's get this out of the way — Kyosho's KE21R was the most impressive pull-start RTR engine I've ever used. It never took more than five pulls to fire it up for break-in, throughout the photo shoot, and during all of my testing. The carburetor was responsive to changes without constantly needing to be tweaked, and it proved to be a great match for the car's capabilities with plenty of power. After patiently breaking in the engine and tuning it to breathe fire, it lit up the tires from a standstill and left four trails of dirt in its wake; the combination of the engine's power and the aluminum clutch shoes gives the Readyset impressive acceleration that makes it easy to hop through consecutive jumps or squirt out of a rut toward the next obstacle. The engine is the heart of any racecar, and it's the defining factor of any nitro-powered RTR. Score one for the MP9 Readyset!

While 1/8-scale buggies were bred for the racetrack, they're tremendously fun to drive anywhere, but I've never been able to bring myself to go searching for the biggest trail jumps and berms with a $900+ MP9 kit. The Readyset, however, was eager to oblige my increasing curiosity and bravery. By the end of the day, I was sending the buggy over the tallest berm at our favorite Escondido park track, flying 3 to 4 feet overhead and covering at least 30 feet before smacking back to the ground — it sounds impressive, but it's not an atypical obstacle on large nitro racetracks in the U.S. The buggy sailed straight and true each time, was manageable in flight, and though it bottomed out when landing, it never got out of shape. When it was time to get on the binders, stabbing the trigger forward brought the Readyset to a controlled halt in a straight line, an indication that the front-to-rear brake bias is right on the money. The brakes were easy to modulate when entering a corner so that the fronts didn't lock up and cause the buggy to push, and once broken in, they showed very little sign of fading after plenty of hardcore testing.

Once I got the MP9 Readyset to Chula Vista RC Raceway, it was even easier to see the car's close resemblance to the full-blown racing model. Even with the stock tires I was able to immediately start clocking respectable laps, pushing the car harder as I grew more comfortable. The MP9 platform has a great mix of steering and traction, which makes carrying cornering speed easy, and the car stayed composed over the track's rougher sections. In fact, the limits of the Readyset's capabilities proved to be the included servos — rated at just 90 oz.-in. of torque with a .16-second transit time, they're perfectly fine for cruising around but not quite fast or strong enough to truly drive the car hard. They do tame the car's reactivity down, however, which will make it easier for new drivers to learn to control it before upgrading.

+

  • Reliable and powerful engine

  • Well-sorted chassis is equally at home on the track and trail

  • Highly upgradeable

  • AA holder used for receiver power

  • Not-quite-powerful-enough servos dampen car's otherwise stellar performance

FINAL WORD

With so much of the RC world going toward electric power, it takes something special for a nitro RTR to stick out above the crowd — but that's exactly what Kyosho came up with when they created the MP9 Readyset. A quick perusal of the MP9 Readyset's parts list for those items indicated “MP9RS,” designating that they're exclusive to the RTR version, shows just how close this car is to full factory racing spec. While it would be cost-prohibitive to upgrade the whole car piece by piece, that potential is indicative of how much room for growth this buggy has — it is, after all, based on a World Champion.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset-2/feed/ 0
GMADE SAWBACK http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=gmade-sawback http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:20:00 +0000 RC Car Action http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback/ 1/10 4WD TRAIL TRUCK | KIT

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

Jeep style and scaler detailing unite in this rugged trail machine

SAWBACK

Once familiar only to in-the-know crawling fans, Gmade's newest flat-fendered ride and a push from distributor HRP stand to give the brand far more publicity. Gmade broke into the industry with the R1 competition crawler, and now they've gone head-first after the scale market with the Sawback. Their experience on the rocks shows immediately, as the Sawback sports a very realistic-looking C-channel side rail chassis made of nickel-plated steel that provides a solid backbone, but it's the little things accenting the Sawback's unique suspension, overall setup, and rugged appearance that set it apart out on the trail — especially the old-school Jeep body. As I came closer to completing the Sawback's assembly, I felt like I was working on a full-sized custom Jeep in my garage in the early hours of the morning with only the anticipation of completing the build fueling me, and then I had to wait for the sun to rise to try it out!

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: GMA52000

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price: $269

  • Width: 5.58 in. (218mm)

  • Height: 9.68 in. (246mm)

  • Length: 17.4 in. (442mm)

  • Wheelbase: 11.29 in. (287mm)

  • Weight: 6.82 lb. (3093g)

  • Chassis: Nickel-plated steel C-channel

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Steel leaf spring

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): N/A

  • Shock positions, chassis (F/R): 1/1

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 1/1

  • Shocks: Aluminum body, friction dampening with internal spring

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven 4WD with 3-counter gears/42.8:1 with 12-tooth pinion

  • Slipper clutch: None

  • Differential: Diff locker

  • Driveshafts: Steel front dogbones and rear straight driveshaft, plastic telescoping center shafts

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded

WHEELS AND TIRES

  • Wheels: Gmade VR01 3-piece 1.9 in. bead-lock

  • Tires: Gmade MT1901 1.9 in., super soft compound

  • Body: Gmade “no-top” Jeep-style body with interior

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Transmitter: Airtronics M12 2.4GHz (#90482, $480)

  • Receiver: Airtronics FHSS-4 4-channel receiver (#92014, $140)

  • Speed control: Tekin FX-R brushed FWD/REV speed control (#TT1091, $100)

  • Motor: Tekin T35 35-turn brushed motor (#TT2122, $65)

  • Steering servo: Savöx SC-0251MG “Larger Standard” Digital High-Torque Metal Gear Servo (#SAVSC0251MG, $41)

  • Battery: Racers Edge Prime 7.4V 75C 6000mAh Race Edition LiPo w/Deans plugs (#RCELP2S600075C, $110)

LEAF SPRING SUSPENSION

The Sawback's leaf spring suspension can be adjusted quickly and easily.

The TS-03 shocks did a good job of taming all the terrain thrown at the Sawback.

If scale realism is what you're aiming for, it doesn't get more scale than the Sawback's leaf spring suspension. Gmade includes a set of three leaf springs to fine-tune the Sawback's suspension to your specific driving needs. The leaf springs themselves connect to the axles with heavy-duty U-bolts. You can set the suspension to standard, soft, and hard. Since most of the driving I was intending on doing was rock crawling and mountain terrain, I initially set up the leaf springs to the softest setting. Damping duties are handled by the TS-03 aluminum shocks included with the Sawback, which feature interchangeable internal springs to back up the leaf springs in big-hit situations.

TRAIL-SPEC DRIVETRAIN

The twist-off gear cover gives you easy access to the pinion gear for quick ratio changes. Plastic universal shafts transfer the power from the center gearbox to the front, and rear axles and performed well, with no pop-offs to report.


The Sawback's full-time 4WD system is all business and was built with heavy horsepower in mind. The axle internals are housed in a robust graphite plastic housing that will withstand the hardest blows that are thrown at it. The ring and pinion gears are made of solid metal to ensure they put the power to the ground without stripping. Diff access is as easy as removing four screws to pop off the realistic-looking, polished metal differential cover. The center transmission houses three counter gears that add up to serious gear reduction. The Sawback includes a 12-tooth 32-pitch pinion gear that gives you a 42.8:1 overall ratio for a good mix of speed and climbing power. During testing, I installed a 9-tooth pinion that reduced the ratio even more to a stump-pulling 57:1. A pair of telescoping universal shafts connects the center tranny to the front and rear axles. The Sawback comes with a full set of ball bearings to ensure super smooth power delivery.

STEEL LADDER FRAME

The Sawback's nickel-plated chassis is so realistic that it will have you doing double takes. Although the chassis bolts together using nylon-captured nuts, it is still a good idea to use thread-lock.

When the Sawback has its body off, the first thing that catches your attention is its gorgeous frame, reminiscent of full-sized project cars. The ladder frame construction features steel C-channel side rails. The cross members that connect the rails, which include the receiver box, skidplate, and battery tray, bridge the rails and contribute to the chassis' torsional stiffness. The front of the chassis is protected by an attractive metal bumper, and the chassis itself is finished in an attractive nickel-plating that resists rust, improves durability, and looks fantastic.

THE SAWBACK INCLUDES METAL STEERING LINKAGES AS STANDARD THAT NOT ONLY ADD STEERING PRECISION, BUT ALSO MUCH-NEEDED WEIGHT TO THE FRONT OF THE TRUCK, WHICH HELPS WHEN CLIMBING STEEP HILLS AND ROCKS

Diff access is easy — just like a full-size truck.

Standard 12mm hexes accomo-date a huge variety of wheels.

The “engine cover” hides the speed control and receiver.

METAL LINKAGE STEERING

The Sawback's metal steering linkages won't buckle under pressure, which allows you to drive a precise line.

There are a lot of 4WD off-road and crawler vehicles on the market today that come with plastic linkage steering systems and only offer aluminum or steel linkages as aftermarket upgrades. The Sawback includes metal steering linkages as standard that not only add steering precision, but also much-needed weight to the front of the truck, which helps when climbing steep hills and rocks. Whereas plastic linkages bend or deflect under extreme loads, the Sawback's linkages hold true, allowing you to drive the line you want. The instructions have you assemble the steering with 0-degree of toe, but you can add toe-in or out at any time if you choose.

BEHIND THE WHEEL

The snow of Big Bear was no match for the Sawback.

Big Bear Lake, CA, was the first place that came to mind for testing the Sawback, and it proved an ideal stomping ground. Big Bear is nestled in SoCal's San Bernardino National Forest and has a near-infinite amount of natural rock, forest, and lake features, making it the perfect playground to test the limits of the Sawback. Snowboarding season had just started in Big Bear at the time of testing and the area had just received a snowstorm that dropped four inches of fresh powder, so the Sawback was ready to attack. Most drivers of full-sized cars that venture onto snow usually need tire chains to find traction in the white stuff, but these aren't necessary with the Sawback's aggressively lugged MT1901 tires. The tread pattern did an exceptional job digging into the snow, even when the trail went up and the white stuff was deep. As I moved out of the snow and onto some thick mud with molasses-like consistency, the Sawback made short work of the dense sludge, using its low gearing to power its way through. The chassis and all the components under the body were getting extremely dirty, but with everything nicely sealed, not a single piece of debris made its way to the electronics. I decided to clean off the Sawback the easy way and took it for a dip in Big Bear Lake. The lakeside had some slippery stones and moss-covered rocks, which did slow down the Sawback, but with some finesse, I was able to claw my way out of the wetness. Now that the Sawback was clean, I searched for a challenging rock garden, with obstacles escalating in difficulty, in order to test the different settings for the leaf springs. I started with the standard leaf spring setting, which handled small-sized rocks easily as the suspension conformed effectively around the obstacles. Moving on to medium to larger rocks, the Sawback started to show the limitations in suspension articulation and tended to lift a tire or two in the air, which wasn't the most stable way to rock climb, but the Sawback stayed upright and made its way through anything. I pulled the truck over and changed the leaf spring suspension to the softest setting. Back on the rocks, I directed the Sawback toward the medium- and large-sized rocks again and the suspension change was obvious. The suspension instantly gained approximately 20% more articulation, which now had me searching for harder lines to throw at the Sawback. Though the included kit tires were a soft compound, they were a little on the firm side compared to competition rock crawling tires and showed some tire slippage when the incline got super steep. The Sawback isn't a lightweight vehicle by any means, and that's helpful when you're rock crawling. It handled steep descents effortlessly as the weight kept all four tires hunkered down, while navigating a line with precision was easy thanks to the 57:1 ratio working in conjunction with the speed control's drag brake. While wrapping up the testing session, I threw on a set of rock crawler competition tires just for kicks. Though not as authentic looking as the Sawback's kit tires, the comp tires were made of soft-compound rubber that serious crawlers demand. With comp-grade rubber, the Sawback was an untamed animal that put a huge grin on my face as it fought through impressively tough terrain and stayed on all fours.

REALISTIC BODY

Designed to look like an early WW II-style Jeep, the Sawback's body is constructed of thick Lexan that withstood multiple rollovers during testing without suffering a crack. The stylish interior features nylon plastic seats, steering wheel, shifter, and rear-view mirror, accompanied by a decal sticker dashboard with dials and a glovebox. The windshield can even be folded down on those warm, sunny days — just don't get any bugs stuck in your teeth!

THE SCALE LOOKS ARE BACKED UP WITH TRUE-TO-SCALE PERFORMANCE AND THEN SOME; THE INSPIRATION AND FUN FACTOR THAT THE SAWBACK POSSESSES IS IMMENSE

+

  • Super-scale looks

  • Versatile internal gear ratio

  • Adjustable leaf spring suspension

  • Nickel-plated chassis fights scratches and corrosion

  • Chassis cross members come loose without thread-lock and extra build attention

  • Tires could be a softer compound

FINAL WORD

If scale crawlers are what you like, they don't get any more realistic than the Gmade Sawback. With the body off, the Sawback will have you doing double takes wondering if it's full-scale or RC. The scale looks are backed up with true-to-scale performance and then some; the inspiration and fun factor that the Sawback possesses is immense, so immense that it's beginning to inspire me to get a full-sized replica of this rig and go tame the unknown. I've always been a racer at heart, so if that's not the best compliment that I could give this truck, I don't know what is.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/gmade-sawback/feed/ 0
TEAM ASSOCIATED SC10RS http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=team-associated-sc10rs http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:20:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs/ 1/10-SCALE ELECTRIC 2WD SHORT COURSE TRUCK | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

AE's newest RTR puts the Race in Race Spec

SC10RS

Team Associated launched the modern short course scene into the realm of competitive racing with the original SC10 kit, utilizing the then-undefeated ROAR National Champion RC10T4 platform as the basis for what quickly became the winningest truck in its class. By taking the T4 and stretching the chassis, then adorning the kit with scale-specific features like front and rear bumpers, an accurately modeled body, and even a set of mudflaps, the SC10 retained the T4's track prowess injected with a huge dose of scale realism. The platform served equally well in RTR form, fitted with proprietary electronics and topped with one of several officially licensed color schemes, but in typical Team Associated fashion, the engineers couldn't leave well enough alone. The new features and add-ons that had been developed for the kit version by their racing team (which is still undefeated in the modified 2WD short course class at the ROAR Nationals, now going on six years straight) trickled down to the RTR to create the newest version, the SC10RS, which stands for “Race Spec.” And they're not kidding.

VEHICLE SPECS



  • Item no.: 7054 (part no. varies by body choice)

  • Scale: 1/10

  • Price:* $320

  • Width: 11.54 in. (293mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.2 in. (30mm)

  • Length: 21.65 in. (550mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.87 in. (327mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 4.59 lb. (2080g)

  • Chassis: Plastic composite tub

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Lower H-arm with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber link positions (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled aluminum coilover shocks

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: 3-gear transmission/2.6:1

  • Spur gear/pinion: 87/18

  • Slipper clutch: Externally adjustable dual-disc

  • Differential: Oil-filled bevel gear

  • Driveshafts: Steel dogbones

  • Bearings: Rubber-sealed

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Team Associated KMC replicas, black

  • Tires (F/R): Team Associated Stock SC10/JConcepts Subcultures, Green Compound

  • Body: Team Associated SC10

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Associated XP2G 2.4GHz 2-channel

  • Receiver: Associated TRS403SSi 2.4GHz 4-channel

  • Speed control: Associated XP SC700 brushless sensorless

  • Motor: Reedy 3300rpm/volt brushless sensorless

  • Steering servo: Associated XP S1903

TEST EQUIPMENT (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Battery: Reedy WolfPack 6500mAh 7.4V 2S LiPo (#734, $70)

* Varies by dealer

TRACK-DERIVED SUSPENSION

V2-edition shocks mate with tried-and-true T4-style suspension for a ride that can't be beat — literally!

The front and rear suspension for the SC10RS are lifted straight from the T4, with long arms and adjustable links poised to soak up any terrain. The RS retains all of the tuning options of the kit as well, and while it may not have the multitude of adjustments of some kits' Swiss-cheese-looking pieces, all of the available shock and camber link mounting options are strategically placed. Those suspension arms are damped by blue-anodized V2-style shocks that use preload clips for ride-height adjustment. Although these have since been replaced on the latest version of Factory Team kits by new big-bore-style dampers, the SC10RS's V2 units are head-and-shoulders above Team Associated's original shocks, with a much-improved O-ring seal construction that greatly improved durability.

RUGGED POWERTRAIN

The big news in the RS's transmission department is the V2-style slipper, which simply works better than what it replaced.

The compact 3-gear transmission is fitted with a gear differential, rather than the ball unit found in the Factory Team kit, but external adjustment is an easy sacrifice for bulletproof durability. The gear diff is sealed, offering the opportunity to be tuned with silicone oils of varying viscosity, but the RS's standard setup is versatile enough to work on almost any terrain. The V2 slipper clutch, another upgrade developed on the racetrack, offers a wider range of adjustment and is more consistent than the original unit that it replaced. The RS uses steel dogbones in place of CV-style axles, which are more expensive and require more maintenance, and should offer better handling over rough terrain to boot. Both front and rear axles on the SC10RS are fitted with 12mm drive hexes, which not only open up the available wheel choices to those offered for many different vehicles (even from other manufacturers), but allow the same wheels to be used in the front and rear.

STRETCHED CHASSIS

Team Associated calls the receiver box “water resistant,” but short of submerging the vehicle, it should keep the precious electronics safe from the elements.

The difference in wheelbase between the T4 and SC10 trucks is all accounted for in the molded tub chassis — as near as makes no difference, an inch and a half. The rest of the platform is similar, with front kick-up to recline the steering bellcranks to match the plane of the caster blocks, various structural ribbing to alter the truck's flex characteristics, and a swing-away battery hold-down strap that's secured by two twisting thumbscrews that need only be flicked 90 degrees in either direction to install or remove the battery. The underside of chassis is smooth and devoid of anything that may snag on the track surface, with raised edges for more cornering clearance, and lightweight nerf bars attach to the sides to provide support for the body should any rough-housing happen amongst competitors.

ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT


The XP2G fits well into hands of all sizes, operates seamlessly, and offers big adjustment dials that are easy to see and use at quick glance.

There's ample room for any electronic choices, and the water-resistant receiver box keeps the included XP receiver tucked into its own cozy cocoon.

The SC700 speed control is a smooth operator despite being sensorless.

Perhaps the most striking feature of the SC10RS over its predecessors is what's wrapped around the KMC replica wheels bolted to the rear axles: Team Associated's scale-specific short course tires were eschewed in favor of JConcepts Subcultures in gumball-soft Green Compound. Associated treads are still found up front, and the four are tucked within the fenders of the SC10's now-iconic body shell that closely mimics the trucks that duke it out in the Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series — with six officially licensed schemes to choose from. Team Associated fitted their own electronics, with a no-nonsense 2.4GHz radio system, metal gear servo, and XP SC700 brushless speed control accompanied by a Reedy 3300rpm/volt sensorless motor.

CHOOSE YOUR BODY



In addition to the faithful recreation of Carl Renezeder's Lucas Oil-sponsored truck, as well as the fan favorite Rockstar/Makita and Hart & Huntington schemes, the SC10RS is now available with Lucas Oil Slick Mist livery, CJ Greaves' awesome Monster Energy Toyota colors, and Eric Barron's incredible old-school Toyota factory TRD paintjob!

BEHIND THE WHEEL


I felt comfortable pushing the SC10RS almost immediately after walking up to the drivers' stand of SDRC Raceway, and the SC10RS's racing background is apparent from the first lap. The truck dives hard into the corner and rotates through the apex smoothly, without squirming around or getting out of shape. The T4 front suspension and steering setup gives the truck an incredible amount of steering throw in both directions, and it helps the SC10RS carve through tight corners like a samurai sword — perfect for the tight and twisty layout. I don't know if it's simply the shape of the body or the arrangement of the suspension, but the SC10 feels long and narrow behind the wheel — which isn't to say that it's tippy or unstable, but a comment on its composure while still being highly maneuverable when transitioning from one direction to the other. None of the jumps at the indoor track presented even the slightest hiccup, as the truck soaked up the track's bumps and jumps in stride.

The biggest changes from the original SC10 are best felt when bombing through a stretch of native terrain outdoors, when the peppy Reedy brushless motor has room to stretch its legs. This is where the JConcepts tires on the rear shine — at no time did the rear end of the truck step out of line unless commanded. With the balance of traction shifted more toward the rear than the original SC10 RTR, the RS begs to be driven with a heavy throttle finger and a huge smile. The truck tracked true every time I stabbed the throttle, unweighting the front tires and charging ahead with a slight rearward squat. The added rear grip from the soft-compound rubber meant that I could toss the truck harder into a turn, knowing that it would stick well enough to stop yawing when I wanted, and the lugs of the Subcultures dug well into softer dirt to help the truck power around big, rutted berms without incident. Braking stability is increased as well, with the truck only getting out of shape if the brakes were locked up on especially slippery hardpack, but it only served to make sliding the truck around more fun. Bigger jumps outdoors exposed more of a parachute effect from the big body that I found at the track, but it's nothing that a little bit of creative trimming wouldn't fix. Though the on-track performance of the SC10RS is an improvement over its predecessor, its biggest gains are only fully exploited when thrashing around a free-driving site.

+

  • Additional rear grip greatly improves the truck's overall performance

  • Wheel hexes are easier to use and take the guesswork out of maintaining stock of front and rear wheels

  • Brilliant new body choices

  • Aggressive handling may be challenging for newer drivers

FINAL WORD

It's difficult to mess with success, but the RS is an improvement over the original RTR in every way. Its various chassis upgrades, stolen straight from Team Associated's racing garage, add refreshing nuances to its driving demeanor, with added durability to boot, and the addition of some seriously race-ready rubber takes the truck to a whole new level in any situation. My favorite update, however, is the new bodies: I couldn't help but swoon over the new Toyota TRD racing paint scheme, a dutiful homage to the trucks that Ivan “Ironman” Stewart and Rod Millen raced in the original Mickey Thompson Stadium Off-Road Racing Series, the birthplace of short course racing. When it's time to update a winning platform, it can be tough to make improvements across the board — but the SC10RS nailed it.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/team-associated-sc10rs/feed/ 0
KYOSHO MP9 READYSET http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kyosho-mp9-readyset http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 14:20:00 +0000 Aaron Waldron http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset/ 1/8-SCALE NITRO 4WD BUGGY | RTR

PHOTOS BY JOEL NAVARRO

A world champion fresh out of the box

MP9 READYSET

Kyosho's new Inferno MP9 Readyset represents the upper echelon of today's competitive RTR 1/8-scale buggies, but in order to appreciate its place in RC history, you need to know first where it came from. As the class's popularity exploded at the local level, vast improvements in glow engine technology and suspension design in the early 2000s helped launch 1/8-scale nitro buggies to the forefront of RC racing. However, Kyosho was already enjoying a head start — after introducing the Inferno line of buggies in 1992, they went on an unprecedented tear of six straight IFMAR World Championships (and have won eight of the last eleven). RTR vehicles hit the scene at about the same time, and for the last decade, Kyosho's race-winning experience trickled down to the entry-level consumer with various almost-ready-to-run and full RTR versions of their most popular buggies. The MP9 Readyset is the trickest one yet, closely mimicking the TKI3 version of the MP9 that Kyosho's team drivers use in international competition, and yet Kyosho was able to turn a world-beating kit that sells for $900 into an RTR that sells for little more than half that.

VEHICLE SPECS


  • Item no.: KYO31888T1B

  • Scale: 1/8

  • Price*: $500

  • Width: 12.1 in. (307mm)

  • Height: 7.1 in. (180mm)

  • Ground clearance: 1.1 in. (28mm)

  • Length: 19.3 in. (490mm)

  • Wheelbase: 12.8 in. (325mm)

  • Weight, as tested: 7 lb. 6.9 oz. (3370g)

  • Chassis: Stamped aluminum plate

SUSPENSION

  • Type: Independent H-arm suspension with upper camber link

  • Inboard camber link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Outboard camber-link positions (F/R): 2/2

  • Shock positions, towers (F/R): 3/3

  • Shock positions, arms (F/R): 2/2

  • Shocks: Oil-filled coilover shocks with threaded aluminum bodies

DRIVETRAIN

  • Type/ratio: Shaft-driven, four-wheel drive/3.31:1

  • Spur gear/clutch bell: 46/13

  • Clutch: 3-shoe centrifugal clutch with aluminum shoes

  • Differential: Front, center, and rear oil-filled bevel gear differentials

  • Driveshafts: Steel CV-style front driveshafts, steel center and rear dogbones

  • Bearings: Metal-shielded ball bearings

WHEELS & TIRES

  • Wheels: Kyosho white dish wheels

  • Tires: Kyosho Micro Square Pin with open-cell foam inserts

  • Body: Kyosho pre-screened MP9 body

ELECTRONICS

  • Transmitter: Kyosho KT-201 3-channel 2.4GHz

  • Receiver: Kyosho KR-200 4-channel 2.4GHz

  • Engine: Kyosho KE-21R .21

  • Steering and throttle servos: Kyosho KS-401

  • Battery: Four AA batteries

TEST GEAR (NOT INCLUDED)

  • Fuel: Byron Originals 20% RACE 2000 Gen2, quart (#3130216, $10)

TRACK-READY SUSPENSION

Threaded preload collars on the gunmetal-anodized large-bore shocks are among the easy adjustments you can make to the MP9 to suit any running condition.

Armed with the same threaded large-bore shocks as the TKI3, minus a set of shock boots, the MP9 Ready-set's long-arm suspension is fit for both the racetrack and any terrain you'll find off the beaten path. The shock towers are stamped from 6061 aluminum, rather than machined from 7075-rated material, which helps to lower the cost of the overall buggy. Some of the near-infinite tuning options of the factory kit, like the Swiss cheese shock and camber link mounting options, were reduced in order to simplify suspension setup for the introductory racer. There's still plenty to be adjusted, however, with threaded camber and toe links, caster, and more. The suspension pivot blocks use replaceable bushings, like the TKI3, so you can alter the car's toe-in and anti-squat, and change them out when they wear. The front and rear hubs are plastic, and the steering knuckles are cast aluminum, but all three can be updated to the machined-aluminum pieces from the TKI3.

RACE-WINNING PLATFORM

Protective boxes for the receiver and battery pack keep both vital items safe and secure. The forward-flipping fuel tank lid is accessible with the body on for quick pit stops!

If the shocks don't convince you of this buggy's pedigree, look no further than the stamped aluminum radio tray on the MP9 Readyset for proof that Kyosho's racing influence directly benefits its product line, as it's the same unit used on the TKI3. Rather than being tucked behind the receiver box like on the original MP9, the clip-secured box for the receiver battery (or AA holder, which comes with the RTR) is mounted in the right-side mud guard next to the steering servo for better weight distribution. Just a couple of years ago, Kyosho frontman Jared Tebo hand-fabricated this mod on his racecars before it was introduced in the TKI2 kit, and rather than using up old parts, Kyosho went with this new design for the Readyset. Again, using stamped 6061 aluminum in place of machined 7075 for the chassis contributed to most of the Readyset's cost savings, as the replacement Readyset chassis is less than half the price of the full-option TKI3 plate ($50 versus $120). That's a perfect example of living in affluence while spending responsibly, or what the younger crowd would call “ballin' on a budget.” Plastic chassis braces add an appropriate amount of rigidity to allow the suspension to do its job.


Kyosho's KT201 radio is light and comfortable, and the but tons on top make it simple to navigate through the adjustments displayed on the screen — it's not very big, but it's better than using analog adjustment dials!

TOP-SHELF TOPPINGS

Not only does the polished exhaust pipe look nice, but the shape of its cone is also tuned to provide a balance of power and fuel economy. Tuned pipes are often an option for most RTRs!

The MP9 Readyset sports the previous-generation TKI2 body, which looks more conservative than the radical cab-forward TKI3 lid, and beneath it is similarly high-quality equipment. Kyosho's own radio equipment is used throughout, with a digital version of the comfortable and lightweight Syncro KT-201 2.4GHz transmitter mating to the tiny KR-200 4-channel receiver, and KS-401 servos handle both steering and throttle/brake duties. Lightweight white dish wheels wrapped in aggressive “micro square pin-type” tires are bolted to the buggy's industry standard 17mm hubs, which are motivated by Kyosho's KE21R pull-start engine that breathes out of a polished and tuned exhaust pipe.

KYOSHO'S ENGINEERS SPENT CONSIDERABLE EFFORT ON CREATING DIFFERENTIALS FOR THE MP9 THAT WERE SMALLER AND LIGHTER THAN TRADITIONAL DIFFS, WHICH PUTS LESS STRAIN ON THE ENGINE AND CLUTCH WHILE OFFERING FASTER ACCELERATION

TRACK-OPTIMIZED DRIVETRAIN

The MP9 platform's drivetrain is arranged to keep the driveshafts straight, which makes them as efficient as possible. Dogbones replace the center universals of the TKI3.

Because the strain of racing with high-powered engines is rougher than anything an RTR will likely see, MP9 Ready-set's powertrain is pulled straight from the TKI3 racecar with the simple change of using dogbones for the center and rear driveshafts (but maintaining the front universals). Kyosho's engineers spent considerable effort on creating differentials for the MP9 that were smaller and lighter than traditional diffs, which puts less strain on the engine and clutch while offering faster acceleration, and the Readyset's engine is quite thankful for that foresight! The differentials themselves are filled with oil, rather than grease like many RTRs, and the MP9's standard 3-shoe aluminum clutch is installed in place of a cheaper and simpler plastic 2-shoe setup.

TEST GEAR: BYRON RACE GEN2 FUEL


Since RC cars powered by glow engines use special fuel, rather than simple unleaded gasoline, choosing the right juice is important. Every RC fuel uses three ingredients — nitromethane, methyl alcohol (also called methanol), and oil (in varying amounts of synthetic and castor varieties) — though each fuel manufacturer has their own mixing protocols and sources. Byron Fuels offers several different fuels to suit anyone from the backyard hero to the Worlds-level racer. Since Kyosho recommends using 20% nitro in the KE21R engine, I chose RACE 2000 Gen2 for its middle-of-the-road 12% oil package, which offers a balance of power, tuning consistency, and engine protection.

BEHIND THE WHEEL


Let's get this out of the way — Kyosho's KE21R was the most impressive pull-start RTR engine I've ever used. It never took more than five pulls to fire it up for break-in, throughout the photo shoot, and during all of my testing. The carburetor was responsive to changes without constantly needing to be tweaked, and it proved to be a great match for the car's capabilities with plenty of power. After patiently breaking in the engine and tuning it to breathe fire, it lit up the tires from a standstill and left four trails of dirt in its wake; the combination of the engine's power and the aluminum clutch shoes gives the Readyset impressive acceleration that makes it easy to hop through consecutive jumps or squirt out of a rut toward the next obstacle. The engine is the heart of any racecar, and it's the defining factor of any nitro-powered RTR. Score one for the MP9 Readyset!

While 1/8-scale buggies were bred for the racetrack, they're tremendously fun to drive anywhere, but I've never been able to bring myself to go searching for the biggest trail jumps and berms with a $900+ MP9 kit. The Readyset, however, was eager to oblige my increasing curiosity and bravery. By the end of the day, I was sending the buggy over the tallest berm at our favorite Escondido park track, flying 3 to 4 feet overhead and covering at least 30 feet before smacking back to the ground — it sounds impressive, but it's not an atypical obstacle on large nitro racetracks in the U.S. The buggy sailed straight and true each time, was manageable in flight, and though it bottomed out when landing, it never got out of shape. When it was time to get on the binders, stabbing the trigger forward brought the Readyset to a controlled halt in a straight line, an indication that the front-to-rear brake bias is right on the money. The brakes were easy to modulate when entering a corner so that the fronts didn't lock up and cause the buggy to push, and once broken in, they showed very little sign of fading after plenty of hardcore testing.

Once I got the MP9 Readyset to Chula Vista RC Raceway, it was even easier to see the car's close resemblance to the full-blown racing model. Even with the stock tires I was able to immediately start clocking respectable laps, pushing the car harder as I grew more comfortable. The MP9 platform has a great mix of steering and traction, which makes carrying cornering speed easy, and the car stayed composed over the track's rougher sections. In fact, the limits of the Readyset's capabilities proved to be the included servos — rated at just 90 oz.-in. of torque with a .16-second transit time, they're perfectly fine for cruising around but not quite fast or strong enough to truly drive the car hard. They do tame the car's reactivity down, however, which will make it easier for new drivers to learn to control it before upgrading.

+

  • Reliable and powerful engine

  • Well-sorted chassis is equally at home on the track and trail

  • Highly upgradeable

  • AA holder used for receiver power

  • Not-quite-powerful-enough servos dampen car's otherwise stellar performance

FINAL WORD

With so much of the RC world going toward electric power, it takes something special for a nitro RTR to stick out above the crowd — but that's exactly what Kyosho came up with when they created the MP9 Readyset. A quick perusal of the MP9 Readyset's parts list for those items indicated “MP9RS,” designating that they're exclusive to the RTR version, shows just how close this car is to full factory racing spec. While it would be cost-prohibitive to upgrade the whole car piece by piece, that potential is indicative of how much room for growth this buggy has — it is, after all, based on a World Champion.

SOURCES

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/03/24/kyosho-mp9-readyset/feed/ 0
RC Short Course Winter 2014 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/02/25/rc-short-course-winter-2014-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rc-short-course-winter-2014-2 http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/02/25/rc-short-course-winter-2014-2/#comments Tue, 25 Feb 2014 14:53:12 +0000 RC Car Action Team http://www.rccaraction.com/members/?p=205027   The Short Course craze has been the RC industry’s fastest-growing segment since its inception a few years ago, and with manufacturers constantly churning out new products in search of the next big thing, the scene shows no signs of slowing down. RC Short Course Winter 2014 is available free to premium site members. Features 12 [...]]]>

 

The Short Course craze has been the RC industry’s fastest-growing segment since its inception a few years ago, and with manufacturers constantly churning out new products in search of the next big thing, the scene shows no signs of slowing down. RC Short Course Winter 2014 is available free to premium site members.

Features

12 | 25 Top Tech Tips
Keep your ride running its best By Aaron Waldron

18 | Test Drive: Racers Edge Pro4 Enduro
Race specs, 4WD, and 3S-ready: Racers Edge delivers a serious short course machine By Peter Vieira

24 | First Drive: Pro Line PRO-2
Getting it right the first time! By Aaron Waldron

34 | 1/10-Scale Short Course Truck Buyer’s Guide
Look, no further; they’re all here! By Michael Wortel

52 | Test Drive: Losi FIVE-T Roller
Choose your radio, engine, and pipe for this 4WD racing truck
By Erich Reichert

64 | DHK Hobby Hunter SCT
Is this the best deal in short course? By Aaron Waldron

How-tos
59 | Suspension
Tune-Up
Bring back that like-new bounce in 8 steps
By Peter Vieira

70 | Tekno RC SCT410 Tuning Guide
Fine-tuning the hottest Pro4 truck on the market
By Joel Navarro

Departments

10 | Driver’s Seat

75 | Test Bench
Wing Tote Short Course Truck Tote; ZAP-RT Rubber Toughened CA
By RC Short Course staff

80 | Last Lap
5 Years Since the Slash
By Peter Vieira

Resources
48 | AirAgeStore.com

]]>
http://www.rccaraction.com/members/2014/02/25/rc-short-course-winter-2014-2/feed/ 0