Pit Tips

Pin pliers

It’s easy to convert a pair of pliers into a roll-pin installation tool. Just chuck a cutoff wheel into your rotary tool, and cut a slot into one of the jaws of a pair of slip-joint pliers. When you squeeze the roll pin into the axle with the solid jaw, the slotted jaw allows the other end of the pin to pass through.
Aug 19, 2009 Comments
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Shiny Shock Shafts

If the shock shafts on your car or truck are scratched, you can polish, or buff, out the scratches with a Scotch-Brite pad. A worn shock shaft can damage the O-ring seals in the shock; they’ll then leak, and your vehicle’s handling will suffer. A Scotch-Brite pad will remove most scratches and will buy you some time until you’re able to pick up shiny new shafts.
Aug 18, 2009 Comments
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Secure Battery Connector

All receiver battery packs have a male connector that mates with a female connector on the switch harness. Sometimes, a hard hit can cause the connectors to loosen or be disconnected, and this will cause your vehicle to go out of control. Install a piece of heatshrink tubing over the connectors to prevent them from being disconnected.
Aug 17, 2009 Comments
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Quick body-post fix

If you break one of your car’s body posts, use a small cable tie to hold the pieces together until you can get to the hobby shop to buy a replacement.
Aug 16, 2009 Comments
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Body-Clip Magnet

Attach a magnet to the inside of your vehicle’s body with glue or tape. You?ll be able to remove the clips and then place them on the roof; the magnet will prevent them from getting lost.
Aug 15, 2009 Comments
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Two coats of glue are better than one

It’s great that many RTR vehicles have glued tires, but it’s also a good idea to run a second bead of CA between the tire and rim. Let the glue dry before you run your vehicle. By doing this, you’ll ensure that the tires stay bonded to the rims even during hours of running.
Aug 14, 2009 Comments
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Fuel-tubing head protector

Zip-ties work fine to protect your engine’s cooling head, but there’s a better method, Run fuel tubing around the top of the cooling head as shown, and secure it with zip-ties. It looks better and will offer more protection.
Aug 13, 2009 Comments
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No-crimp servo wires

Most sealed radio boxes have an opening through which the servo wires go, but on some models, the opening is so small that the wires get crimped when you close the radio-box lid. To remedy this, enlarge the opening with a hobby knife or a Dremel tool with a rotary sanding bit.
Aug 12, 2009 Comments
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